Mary-Jo Hill

02 Jun 2018
It is harder than you think. Whilst working with a group of 4 teachers in a local primary school, implementing their own in-house coaching team, their natural and very normal reticence on how it was going to work was a valid one. Thinking that you need to be able to give a fellow teacher some level of expertise or answer or solution is a common pitfall when starting to coach others. What will one think if I am less experienced in teaching years than them? What happens if I have no experience of teaching in year 2? What if they start talking about the real difficulties of teaching? Their life? What can I possibly give them? This pause for thought enabled a founding principle of coaching to be re-visited and re-examined. Yes, one needs credibility but also one is not taking the role of teacher to pupil- or indeed as Karpmann would see it as rescuer to victim. What one is creating is an arena for professional, structured dialogue that requires expert skills in listening, questioning and being absolutely present to their situation. It is not a natural state for teachers. It takes a leap, and is an assumed and very different role to everyday teaching life. So, here I am, with a new revised website with resources to download, and a platform for teachers and wider educational staff and schools, and federations, and academies, to practise and support each other and to really take coaching from a transactional format to a transformational mode. And this is where I am looking for a leg up. It takes me back to this incredible picture of a team working together, who trust each other implicitly and the fact that we can only do this with the honest and trusting faith of another. All retweets and shares and normal social media practice to give each other a leg up welcomed and gratefully received.